Mexico

On 8-9 July, the comrades of Juventudes Marxistas (Marxist Youth) and Izquierda Socialista (Socialist Left) organised a camp to celebrate the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917, an historic event which showed the potential of the working class to take power, eradicate oppression and build an alternative to capitalist society.

Los trabajadores del Sindicato Independiente de los Trabajadores de La Jornada (Sitrajor) han votado por mayoría la huelga el día viernes 30 de junio para defender su Contrato Colectivo de Trabajo, el cual pretende eliminarse por la grave situación financiera por la que atraviesa la empresa que imprime el periódico, el cual ha sido considerado como de izquierda y dar cierta apertura en sus páginas a los movimientos obreros, sociales, populares y estudiantiles en el país.

This article was originally published in Spanish in the runup to the a strike in Mexico on 17 March.

Since President Peña Nieto and his EPN government have implemented energy reforms, which focus on the increase of the price of petrol, there has been ongoing public outcry and nationwide mass demonstrations against it from the beginning of the New Year.

On the 10th anniversary of the Oaxaca commune and the revolutionary movement against electoral fraud we recommend our readers to read or re-read this article, written ten years ago as the events were unfolding throughout Mexico.

On June 19, Mexican police intervened to clear a road blockade in the town of Nochixtlan. The brutal repression left 6 people dead and dozens of others injured, at least 21 were arrested. The blockade had been organised by teachers with the support of the local communities in order to prevent Federal Police from reaching the capital of Oaxaca where striking teachers have organised an encampment.

A new protest movement has started, in an explosive manner, at the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) in Mexico City. On April 14th, three demonstrations were held totaling about fifteen thousand students and workers.

This is a call to all national and international organizations, to the workers and the youth of the world, to send the following resolution to the Mexican authorities in solidarity with comrade Stephanie Arriaga (Fanny) and her family, who are currently victims of extortion and death threats. Comrade Fanny is an outstanding fighter for the rights of students and workers at the Instituto Politécnico Nacional(National Polytechnic Institute)and is an activist in the Mexican section of the International Marxist Tendency.

On August 26, after the end of the demonstration for the 43 Ayotzinapa students disappeared by the state 11 months ago, the Mexico City police attacked a group of activists on their way home, injuring several of them. Amongst them were mothers of the Ayotzinapa students as well as leading members of La Izquierda Socialista (IMT) and the CLEP (Polytechnic Students Struggle Committee).

9 months ago, a group of Ayotzinapa teacher students were attacked by local police in the town of Iguala, Guerrero, and 43 were disappeared against their will. Now, new evidence has now come to light proving the involvement of the Mexican Army in the events of September 26, 2014.

Midterm elections were held in Mexico with an abstention rate of over 55%. Election day was diverse and contradictory. We saw a struggle for an open boycott in states like Oaxaca, Guerrero, Chiapas and Michoacan. An independent candidate in Nuevo Leon won. As well, different expressions of local discontent were revealed as the advance of Morena in Mexico City and the retreat of the PRD, which has ruled the capital since 1997, has shown. The general characteristic of this election is that it reflects a growing criticism of the regime and the need for change. Contrary to official statements, what we saw was not the strengthening of democracy, but rather an increased questioning of all

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One response against the robbery by the capitalists and the cartels has been the arming of the people, above all in the rural areas. In Michoacán, the exactions by the Knights Templar cartel have become as unbearable as the overall violence, with the entrance on the scene of these narco-thug groups, many of them deserters from the state armed forces. One of the things making this situation unbearable has been the onset of the practice of entering people's homes in order to rape women, pushing popular tolerance over the edge.

Over the past couple of years Peña Nieto's government in Mexico has taken giant steps in carrying out reforms which the big bourgeoisie for a long time could only dream of. It presented itself as an unstoppable government which the workers' movement could not confront in a serious manner. But decades of such attacks and struggles have led to a build-up of pressure below the surface that constitutes a great challenge to the system and the regime that supports it. A feeling that things are not going well and that we must act to radically transform the system is taking root in Mexican society.

On 26 February the 2015, the Ninth International day of Action for Ayotzinapa took place. Thousands of people, mainly students, took to the streets of Mexico City in order to demand the return of the 43 students that went missing on 26 September 2014 in Iguala, Guerrero. Five months have passed and the versions of the events, told by the Mexican federal government have all shown to fall apart under scrutiny.

The violent abduction and disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero in September has plunged Mexico into a deep social and political crisis. The case of the Ayotzinapa students has brought the masses onto the streets and convulsed the presidency of Enrique Peña Nieto.

It is now seven weeks since the police attacked students from the Ayotzinapa teacher training college and then kidnapped 43 of the survivors and handed them over to a drug cartel. The brutal incident in the town of Iguala, Guerrero, acted as the proverbial last straw, opening up a wave of mass protests which continues to grow and spread.

Yesterday hundreds of thousands marched in Mexico city and tens of thousands more in dozens of other cities across Mexico to protest at the kidnapping of 43 student-teachers from Ayotzinapa. They were clear in pointing the finger squarely at the Mexican state. The actions were part of a widespread nationwide 48 hour student strike which continues today.